Posts Tagged ‘maintenance’

College Pro Painters – Very unprofessional!

I’ve been trying to get some bids for a new roof and an exterior paint job on my home of two years and as I have seen the handmade signs on the road-side for many years in the Portland Metro area advertising “College Pro Painters”, I decided to call them and get an estimate.  I called and made an in-home appointment for 1:00 PM on July 13th, 2013, approximately ten days prior to the actual appointment.

On the day of the appointment at 1:15 PM (yes, they were late!) they called and left a message to say that they, “Would be on time for our 2:00 PM appointment.”  I guess they must have thought that as I’m a senior that I wouldn’t notice the delayed appointment time!  Anyway, come 2:05 PM (yes, late again!) a woman named “Lauren” called to cancel and asked to reschedule?!!  I told “Lauren” that due to their lack of professionalism and their un-business-like way of conducting their operation, I would not now or ever be interested in using their services!  And then hung up the phone.

Today is July 18, 2013 and guess who just called me to state that she had a note that I was interested in getting an estimate?!! You’re kidding me right? Evidently at her young age she has already developed selective senility considering “Lauren” and I spoke only five days ago!  She also didn’t like me “bad-mouthing” her company and kept trying to cut me off by speaking over me, and doing it rather loudly!

Admittedly she tried to offer me a “trim paint job” as recompense for the bad service and their rude behavior, but putting up with more scheduling headaches from them for the sake of paint on a few skinny boards . . . not worth the attitude.  Forget ’em! I don’t know what her/their problem is but if she is indicative of their company and the other employees they use, then the world would be better off if they’d just closed their doors, permanently!

By the way, a different girl this time called a couple of days ago saying she received a note stating “I might be interested in an estimate” . . . .  sheer stupidity!!  And they’re supposedly “college educated”?  Hmmmm . . . I doubt it.
SparkChaser4
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New vinyl flooring? Say no to detergents!

Finally, thank you Shawna for your question!  Your vinyl installer was right.  Many of the vinyl floorings used today are damaged by strong detergents as well as other cleaners.  Do not use them on your floors.  Just use straight warm water and rinse often.

The reason for no detergent is this, it eventually will remove the protective coating on the vinyl exposing the subsurface to dirt, stains and grit.  You’ll want the coating to last for years so, plain water only.  If you want to disinfect or remove some stain once in a while than typically you can use a little vinegar in your water, but not straight vinegar!  I mix a couple of tablespoons in a pint spray bottle with the balance filled with warm water.  Spray, then rinse with the mop.  Works great!  Thank you for your question!

SparkChaser4

H&W Carpets review

It’s been almost a year since I hired H&W Carpets to supply and install the flooring in our newly purchased 1974 ranch home. I had to wait this long to write this review for a reason. It was to give them enough time to follow-up on the job (which they didn’t) and time for my temper to cool! Their address is given as: 19505 SW Tualatin Valley Hwy, Aloha, Oregon.

In the beginning everything went as expected, it was near job completion that he (our sales rep) showed us “attitude” in a comment he made to us about when the payment in full was due! Snarky indeed! We have also found poor quality workmanship in the way they installed the flooring. One section of the vinyl was installed leaving what could best be described as a bubble in the flooring upon completion. A bubble approximately 16 inches in diameter!

In another part of the house, the carpet was cut to reinstall the floor heat register to the heat ducting. Only problem is, in addition to the rectangular cut-out, they also made a second cut from one end of the cut-out and extended it out into the flooring where they proceeded to make a large letter “e” cut into the carpet.

My 45+ year construction background tells me that the 4-inch large “e” cut in the carpet field was the installer trying to find the register opening in the floor in the beginning. He then extended it over to cut the rectangular shaped hole afterwards. The fact that he made this excessively large cut without repairing the damage shows poor work ethics as well as a bit of dishonesty in failing to bring it to the attention of either his boss or myself, the buyer.

In both cases what with the vinyl “bubble” and the sliced-up carpet, a proper installer taking pride in his work would have ripped out the damaged flooring and replaced it with new at his own expense if need be, instead of trying to hide his work and hope the buyer doesn’t notice his shoddy workmanship. With numerous flooring suppliers around, I cannot in good faith recommend H&W Carpets, Inc. to anyone. Nor would I even allow them into my house again to clean my floor much less buy and install a new one. My rating? Is there such thing as a Negative Star Rating?

Too bad, as I prefer doing business with local mom and pop shops and tradespeople. Just not this one I guess!

SparkChaser4

What I’ve been up to . . .

Now that my better-half and I have been in this “new” home of ours for nine months now, our efforts are finally beginning to show around the homestead. Particularly the shrubs and plants found in our yard! Here’s a dozen to sample.

And this doesn’t even include the four varieties of plum trees and the taller fauna! I hope like me, you’re all staying busy and enjoying the beautiful weather we’re having now!

God bless.

SparkChaser4

Glock Safety Warning

Here we go again.  Although in this case the accident was the result of a worn holster, it was exacerbated by the ‘type’ of gun contained therein. The ‘type’ of gun being a striker-fired Glock semi-automatic handgun. Now before you jump down my throat, is it not true that all too often when an Accidental Discharge (AD) happens, it is usually caused by operator error? Is is also true that the bulk of the accidental discharges are more common with a Glock weapon than any other? I don’t have anything personally against them, but for a weapon with “supposedly” three safeties to prevent it from occurring, they sure seem to go off a lot anyway.

As a lesson in gun safety/maintenance, this anonymous person still wanted to post this as a lesson to all. And yes, there is a spot of blood in the accompanying pictures so for those few sensitive people, you might want to omit the last photograph. Although I get that much blood from one of my finger-sticks (diabetes, blood-sugar testing). Moral of the story: Always make sure your gear is in top operating condition. The video is courtesy of  ITS Tactical and can be found here.

SparkChaser4

‘Smart Meters’ Prove to Be a Dumb Idea

As an electrician, I stated that a plain electric meter containing a transmitter wasn’t a good idea! Weren’t there enough signals going through the air already without adding another one from every wired home and business around?  Appears I was right, and The Blaze agrees with this consensus. Find their article here.

Now join the crowd and demand their immediate removal and return to the plain meters. This would also give the added benefit of rehiring Meter-readers back on and don’t we need all the jobs we can produce in these times?

SparkChaser4

We knew them as “Sandy”

This picture of a “Sandy” is celebrating the “6th millionth pound of ordinance dropped” over North Vietnam by carrying a special bomb (look under the right-wing!)  While this link (Thanks, Bayou Renaissance Man!) shows the Navy variants of the A1H Skyraider commonly called a “Spad”, the Air Force also had their versions in the Southeast Asian Theatre.  They were usually painted in camouflage colors and were known as a “Sandy” by both the U.S.A.F. and Army “Grunts” on the Vietnamese soil.  You can find some pictures further down on the same link above.  When they fired up the A1H, you couldn’t help but look to see what the loud “pockita-pockita-pockita” sound was coming from. The high horse-powered engine necessary to move such a heavy and highly-armored plane into the air by way of its massive four-bladed propellor.

The Grunts loved it because of the high “loiter-time” it was capable of, the pilots loved it because of the armor and the fact that even when shot full of holes, it would still safely return him back to base.  If it sounds like I thought highly of them, you’re right.  I was one of the aircraft electrical repairmen that kept them flying.  We were more commonly known by the nickname as “Spark-chasers” and were trained to work on many different types of aircraft.  Including but not limited to; jet-powered, propellor-powered and helicopters.  If it flew we fixed it, and not just from the Air Force.

Sometimes we would get battle-damaged aircraft belonging to the Navy and the Marines at our base.  We repaired it sufficiently for it to be able to Return To Base (RTB) back on ship, but sometimes we made sure that back aboard the ship they knew it was courtesy of the United States Air Force that got them their plane back by stating so in big print in the aircraft’s Repair Log.  A little competitiveness was always to be found between the different branches, you had to get your fun where you could!

As to the Sandy, it was a dirty, oily, noisy beast, but I will forever remember their great service to us G.I.s.  And now you know where my nickname originated from also.  By the way, the numeral 4 is because I am number four of nine children and as Paul Harvey would say, “and now you know the rest of the story”.

SparkChaser4